A young woman in Dakota who works 160-acres, says she could work twice that if marriage-minded men would stop bothering her.

-from the Vernon Courier, Vernon, Alabama, 1887

“Hank” Riggs is running his cider mill at full blast and producing a prime quality of “bug” juice.

-from the Austin Statesman,  July 1888

Spontaneous combustion is supposed to be the cause of the fire that destroyed the barn of John Stoner, two miles north of Bethalto.

Fire Destroys Stoner Barn

Spontaneous combustion is supposed to be the cause of the fire that destroyed the barn of John Stoner, two miles north of Bethalto. The fire broke out at three o’clock in the afternoon. Mr. Stoner was in Bethalto at the time, and his wife was alone on the farm. She said the flames broke out suddenly in all parts of the barn. She tried to untie the livestock in the barn, but was unable to do that on account of the flames. One mule and two calves perished in the fire. Twenty-five loads of hay, and all the farm machinery were in the barn as well as a storm buggy and a motorcycle. All were lost in the fire. ¬†from the Alton Evening Telegraph, July 26, 1919

John Buss, who has no superior, and but few equals, as a gardener, has our thanks for some choice beets.

-from the Robinson Argus, Crawford County, Illinois, 1888

Mr. Arthur Antle presented his wife with a new 3-legged milk stool on the occasion of their wedding anniversary last week.

-from The Indian Republican, Tulsa, Indian Territory (IT), 1900 “Published Every Once in a While”

Mind what I tell you;frogs is revolutin’ and I know it.

John Estep, a fisherman, went over to Missouri frog hunting, having received an order from St. Louis for frog hams. Among other frogs he captured, one with five fully developed legs, and he is as proud as a pea fowl about it. In speaking about his latest catch, last evening, Mr. Estep said: ‘I ketched a frog once that had whiskers like a cat. I ketched another one once that had a tail like a muskrat’s. ‘Nother time I hauled in a big feller that only had one hind leg, and that was enough like a chicken’s to have a spur on it, but it didn’t. Then there was a curious old frog I ketched years ago that had a head you’d a swore belonged to a snapping turtle, and the nobby feller with a regular white streak round his neck like a dude’s collar, and a round spot covering one of his eyes that made him look exactly as if he was wearing one of them dandy eye glasses. Then there was the frog I ketched that was so cross-eyed I was almost afraid to take it off the hook. But I consider this here five legged frog the biggest piece of flesh of the kind I ever ketched. I’ll tell you why: It ain’t no freak, this five legger aint. It is the result of deliberation on the part of the frogs. Frogs is gettin’ scarce, but folks has got to have them and the frogs know it. Frogs is the smartest things in creation. Now what does them five legs on this frog mean? It means that the frogs haint no doubt of what they are here fur, and knowing they are growing lesser and lesser on the face of the earth, and in the swamps thereof, they are jest agoing into the growing of more legs, so that the decrease in the number of frogs will be made up by the increase in the number of their fat and juicy kickers. This fellow only has five. They’ll be doing better bimeby, and some of these days I will fetch in a stock of frogs wearing all the way from eight to ten legs apiece, and every one of them of a quality to make a frog-eater go crazy with delight. Mind what I tell ye; frogs is revolutin’ and I know it.”

-from the Alton Telegraph, Alton, Illinois, June 22,1893

Two gigantic cucumbers were brought to town the other day by Mr. X. Wantz, who lives a few miles north of here. TX1894

Texas, 1894

R. K. Tidreck broke a rib last week by his plow coming in contact with a root and giving him a quick jerk. OH1882

Ohio, 1882

Mrs. Newman has a large quantity of silk worm eggs to give to those wishing to try silk culture. IL1887

Illinois, 1887

Mr. Wharton’s watermelons are getting ripe. I saw him out in the patch the other day thumping them. TN1903

Tennessee,1903